AutoInsurance.com
Published: March 8, 2022Last updated: October 19, 2022

How Do DUIs Affect Car Insurance?

A DUI can increase your auto insurance rates by 80 percent on average.

Getting a DUI or DWI can make the process of finding car insurance – affordable car insurance specifically – very difficult. Third-party data suggests that DUI convictions cause auto insurance rates to increase by an average of 80 percent, and statistics show that premiums for drivers with DUIs on their records are often even higher than that.

Irfan Chaudry – an actuary who has worked at EY, Aon Benfield, and Ernst & Young – analyzed thousands of data points for AutoInsurance.com from real car insurance customers. He found that customers with DUIs on their records were more likely than non-DUI drivers to have a number of factors that drove their insurance prices higher. Drivers with DUIs were more likely to have been in at-fault accidents and have several driving tickets, and less likely to own homes, than people without DUIs. Having a bad driving history and being a renter are two of many factors that push car insurance prices higher.

Here are our key findings:

  • People without DUIs are 14 percent more likely to own homes than people with DUIs, and homeowners generally pay lower car insurance rates than renters.
  • People with DUIs are 108 percent more likely to have gotten two to five tickets in the past five years than people without DUIs.
  • People with DUIs are 136 percent more likely to have been involved in at-fault accidents in the past five years than people without DUIs.

How DUIs Impact Car Insurance Costs

When determining car insurance prices, companies calculate driver risk, the risk that someone will file a claim. A driver with a DUI on their record is part of a group of high-risk drivers or nonstandard drivers, and not all car insurance companies offer nonstandard insurance. Even companies that serve people with DUIs have higher rates, ranging from 28 to 371 percent higher than standard policies’ prices, with an 80 percent average increase1.

Person with handcuffs on behind police vehicle

The exact increase will depend on these factors, among others:

  • The amount of time that has passed since the DUI
  • Age of the driver
  • Driving history (at-fault accidents, tickets, etc.)
  • Company
  • State

How Long Will DUIs Impact Car Insurance Rates?

DUIs will impact car insurance costs for as long as the DUI is on the customer’s motor vehicle report. See below for how long a DUI stays on your record in your state.

State How long a DUI will stay on your driving record
Alabama 5 years
Alaska 10 years
Arizona 7 years
Arkansas 5 years
California 10 years
Colorado 5 years
Connecticut 10 years
Delaware Lifetime
District of Columbia 15 years
Florida 10 years
Georgia 5 years
Hawaii 5 years
Idaho 5 years
Illinois 5 years
Indiana 5 years
Iowa 12 years
Kansas Lifetime
Kentucky 10 years
Louisiana 5 years
Maine 10 years
Maryland 10 years
Massachusetts 5 years
Michigan 7 years
Minnesota 10 years
Mississippi 5 years
Missouri 5 years
Montana 10 years
Nebraska 15 years
Nevada 7 years
New Hampshire 10 years
New Jersey 10 years
New Mexico 10 years
New York 10 years
North Carolina 10 years
North Dakota 7 years
Ohio 6 years
Oklahoma 10 years
Oregon 10 years
Pennsylvania 10 years
Rhode Island 5 years
South Carolina 10 years
South Dakota 10 years
Tennessee 10 years
Texas Lifetime
Utah 10 years
Vermont Lifetime
Virginia 10 years
Washington 7 years
West Virginia 10 years
Wisconsin 10 years
Wyoming 10 years

Once the DUI is removed from your driving record, your average car insurance rates will decrease.

Are People With DUIs Less Likely to Own Homes?

People with DUIs are 14 percent less likely to own homes than people without DUIs.

Driver status Has not had a DUI in the past 5 years Has had a DUI in the past 5 years
Owns a home 50% 43%
Does not own a home 50% 57%

While mortgage companies don’t perform criminal background checks, they do perform financial, credit, and employment history background checks. DUIs can affect your income, debt, stability, and job history, meaning they factor into whether or not you can get a mortgage. Therefore, homeownership is another area where DUIs can negatively impact your car insurance premiums.

Are People With DUIs More Likely to Get Tickets?

Not surprisingly, people with DUIs are 108 percent more likely to have had two to five tickets in the past five years – another factor that increases car insurance costs.

Driver status Has not had a DUI in the past 5 years Has had a DUI in the past 5 years
Has had 2-5 tickets in the past 5 years 4% 8%
Has not had 2-5 tickets in the past 5 years 96% 92%

Are People With DUIs More Likely to Get Into At-Fault Accidents?

Finally, people with DUIs are 136 percent more likely to have been involved in at-fault accidents in the past five years.

Driver status Has not had a DUI in the past 5 years Has had a DUI in the past 5 years
Has been involved in an at-fault accident in the past 5 years 11% 27%
Has not been involved in an at-fault accident in the past 5 years 89% 73%

While some companies offer accident forgiveness, being at fault in a car accident will usually cause your premiums to increase, whether or not drugs or alcohol were involved.

Penalties for DUIs by State

Getting a DUI may require drivers to file an SR-22 form (proof of minimum coverage). They may also face license suspension or have to install an ignition interlock device. Find your state’s penalties for DUI convictions below.

Image of SR-22 document

State How long will your license be suspended for the first offense? Do you still have driving privileges during the suspension (limited)? When will you be required to install an ignition interlock device? How long will you have to use the ignition interlock device?
Alabama 90 days Must apply for hardship license Mandatory for high BAC (0.15% and above) and repeat convictions; highly incentivized for

first convictions

First offense, BAC under 0.15%: 6 months

First offense, BAC over 0.15%: 1 year

Second offense: 1 year

Third offense: 3 years

Fourth and subsequent offenses: 5 years

Alaska 90 days After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions First conviction: 6 months

Second conviction: 12 months

Third conviction: 18 months

Arizona 90 days After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions Second or third offense, or offense in which you are driving on a suspended or revoked license due to a prior DWI offense, or you endanger a child with your drunk driving: 1 year after the license suspension/revocation ends or the date of the conviction, whichever is later
Arkansas 6 months Yes Mandatory for all convictions 1 year after the license is no longer suspended or revoked, or, if you have a restricted license, during the period of the original suspension
California 4 months After 30 days Discretionary; mandatory for all convictions in Alameda, Los Angeles, Tulare, and Sacramento counties (pilot project –

extended)

Determined by the court, but can’t exceed 3 years from conviction date
Colorado 3 months Yes Mandatory for high BAC (0.15% and above) and repeat convictions; highly incentivized for

first convictions

Longer than 1 year or the total time remaining on the license restraint for those who have had driving privileges revoked for more than 1 year for driving impaired or under the influence
Connecticut 90 days Yes Highly

incentivized for all convictions

No minimum
Delaware 3 months No Highly incentivized for all convictions No minimum
District of Columbia 2-90 days or until deposition Yes Mandatory for all convictions First conviction: 6 months

Second conviction: 1 year

Third or subsequent conviction: 2 years

Florida 6 months for DUI; 12 months for refusal After 30 or (for refusal) 90 days Mandatory for repeat convictions DWI defendant: 6 months

Someone reinstating their license: No minimum

First conviction: No minimum but will need one installed if driver had someone under 18 in the car

Second conviction: 1 year

Third conviction: 2 years

Georgia 1 year Yes Mandatory for repeat convictions First offense: Must use an interlock but no minimum

Second and subsequent offenses: 12 months from when driver is issued limited driving privileges

Hawaii 3 months After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 1 year

Second offense within 5 years, or first conviction if highly intoxicated: Must install interlock during revocation period

Idaho 90 days After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions No specified time period
Illinois 6 months After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions; highly incentivized for first convictions Period of statutory license suspension
Indiana 180 days Available immediately Mandatory for repeat convictions Determined by the court but can’t exceed the maximum prison sentence
Iowa 180 days After 30 days Highly incentivized for all convictions First offense: $1,000-$2,000 fine, up to 9 months in jail, minimum 6 months with interlock

Second offense: $2,000-$4,000 fine, up to 12 months in jail, minimum 2 years with interlock

Third and fourth offenses: Minimum $4,000 fine, plus the above penalties

Additional penalties for BAC 0.15% or above while under age 18

Kansas 30 days Can apply for limited license after 45-90 days Highly incentivized for all convictions First offense and BAC over 0.08%: 6 months if driver’s record is clear; 1 year if driver has a prior open-container violation or at least 3 moving violations

BAC over 0.15% on first offense, BAC over 0.08% on the second or subsequent offense, or refusal of a breath, blood, or urine test: Length dependent on priors

Kentucky 30-120 days Yes Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 6 months after license revocation

Second offense within 5 years: 1 year

Third or subsequent offense within 5 years: 30 months

Louisiana 2 years Vehicle confiscation Mandatory for BAC 0.2% or above and repeat convictions; highly incentivized for first convictions No specified time period
Maine 90 days Yes Highly incentivized for all convictions As a condition of license reinstatement: 2 years

2 OUI offenses and license revoked for 2 years: 9 months

3 offenses: 3 years

4 or more offenses: 4 years

Maryland 90 days Yes, with interlock Mandatory for all convictions 1-3 years

BAC of 0.15% or more: 1 year minimum

Massachusetts 90 days Yes Mandatory for repeat convictions First offense, high BAC: 2 years

Second offense: 2 years

Third offense: 3 years

Fourth and subsequent offenses: 5 years

Michigan 30-180 days After 45 days Mandatory for high BAC (0.17%) and repeat convictions 1 year, regardless of number of offenses
Minnesota 90 days After 15 days Highly incentivized for high BAC (0.16%) and repeat convictions At court’s discretion
Mississippi 90 days Yes, with interlock Mandatory for all convictions First offense: At court’s discretion

Second and subsequent offenses: 6 months minimum

Missouri 90 days Immediately with interlock use or after 30 days (restricted) Mandatory for repeat convictions 6 months minimum
Montana 6 months Yes Mandatory for repeat convictions First offense: 6 months

Second and third offense: 1 year

Fourth offense: 1 year or more

Nebraska 90 days After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 60 days to 6 months

Second offense: 1 year

Third offense: 2-15 years

Fourth and subsequent offenses: 15 years

Nevada 90 days After 45 days Mandatory for all convictions First and second offenses: 3-6 months

Third and subsequent offenses: 12-36 months

New Hampshire 6 months No privileges during suspension Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 1-2 years, if aggravating factors are present (e.g., high BAC)

Second and subsequent offenses: 1-2 years

New Jersey 3 months Must apply for hardship license Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 6 months to 1 year

Second and subsequent offenses: 1-3 years

New Mexico 1 year for those under 21; 6 months for those over 21 Immediately with interlock Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 1 year

Second offense: 2 years

Third offense: 3 years

Fourth and subsequent offenses: Lifetime (reviewed after 5 years)

New York Yes Yes Mandatory for all convictions First and second offenses: 6 months minimum

Third and fourth offenses: 5 years

Fifth offense: Permanent license revocation (barring extenuating circumstances)

North Carolina 30 days After 10 days Mandatory for high BAC (over 0.15%) and repeat convictions First offense: Not required for low-BAC offenders

Second offense or high BAC: 3 years

Third offense: 7 years (if license is restored)

North Dakota 91 days After 30 days Discretionary First offense: Not required

Second and subsequent offenses: Encouraged, but at court’s discretion

Ohio 90 days After 15 days Mandatory for repeat convictions At court’s discretion
Oklahoma 180 days Yes Mandatory for high BAC (0.15% and above) and repeat convictions; highly incentivized for first convictions First offense: Not required for low-BAC offenders

Second offense or high BAC: 4 years minimum

Third and subsequent offenses: 5 years minimum

Oregon 90 days After 30 days Mandatory for all convictions and diversions First offense: 1 year

Second and subsequent offenses: 2 years

Pennsylvania 12 months Yes, with Occupational Limited License and Ignition Interlock Limited License programs Mandatory for high BAC (over 0.1%) and repeat convictions First offense: Not required for low-BAC offenders

Second and subsequent offenses: 1 year

Rhode Island 30-180 days Conditional hardship license to commute to work, contingent on interlock Mandatory for high BAC (over 0.1%) First offense: Not required

Second offense: 1-2 years, if required

Third and subsequent offenses: 2 years, if required

South Carolina 1 month for BAC over 0.15% Yes Mandatory for high BAC (0.15% or above) and repeat convictions First offense: Not required for low-BAC offenders

Second offense: 2 years

Third offense: 3 years

Fourth and subsequent offenses: Lifetime, if license is reinstated (may apply to remove interlock restriction after 10 years)

South Dakota 30 days Yes Discretionary At the court’s discretion
Tennessee 1 year Yes Mandatory for repeat convictions; highly incentivized for first convictions Up to 1 year upon license reinstatement, regardless of prior offenses
Texas 90 days for BAC of 0.08% or greater; 180 days for refusal Yes Mandatory for high BAC and repeat convictions First offense: 45 days to 6 months

Second offense: 90 days to 1 year

Third offense: 1-10 years

Utah 120 days Temporary limited privileges (for employment, education, child visitation) Mandatory for repeat convictions; highly incentivized for first convictions First offense: Not required, but may be a condition of probation

Second and subsequent offenses: Required as a condition of probation for a time period determined by the courts (3 years for drivers under 21 years old)

Vermont 90 days Eligible for interlock restricted license after 30 days to a year, depending on number of prior offenses Highly incentivized for all convictions First offense: 6 months

Second offense: 18 months

Third offense: 3 years

Fourth offense: Lifetime license suspension, no interlock possibility

Virginia 7 days Yes Mandatory for repeat convictions; highly incentivized for first convictions Minimum 6 months upon license reinstatement, regardless of prior offenses
Washington 90 days Yes, with an interlock driver’s license Mandatory for all convictions First offense: 1 year minimum

Second offense: 5 years minimum

Third offense: 10 years minimum

West Virginia 6 months After 30 days Mandatory for BAC over 0.15% and repeat convictions First offense: 6 months minimum

Second and subsequent offenses: 1 year minimum

Wisconsin 6-9 months Yes Mandatory for high BAC (over 0.15%) and repeat convictions First offense: Not required for low-BAC offenders

Second and subsequent offenses: 1 year minimum, once driving privileges are reinstated

Wyoming 90 days Yes Mandatory for high BAC (over 0.15%) and repeat convictions First offense: Not required for low-BAC offenders

Second offense: 1 year

Third offense: 2 years

Fourth and subsequent offenses: Lifetime (can appeal for removal after 5 years)2 3

Recap

DUIs don’t occur in a vacuum. Rather, people with DUIs are also more likely to have had multiple traffic violations and at-fault accidents in the past five years, which also increases their auto insurance costs.

This can be a vicious cycle. People with DUIs may have trouble finding employment, leading them into debt and difficulty getting mortgages, and lack of homeownership increases car insurance costs further. To learn more, read our other car insurance research.

Methodology

We used thousands of data points from real car insurance customers, collected from May to October of 2021. We also consulted Irfan Chaudry – a former actuary at EY, Aon Benfield, and Ernst & Young – and used third-party data from Alcolock USA, Rubinstein Law Offices, the Governors Highway Safety Association, and the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Citations

  1. Does an Interlock Affect Insurance? ALCLOCK. (2021).
    https://alcolockusa.com/faq/does-an-interlock-affect-insurance/

  2. Alcohol-Impaired Driving Laws by State. GHSA. (2021, Jul).
    https://www.ghsa.org/sites/default/files/2020-07/DrunkDrivingLaws_0720.pdf

  3. State Ignition Interlock Laws. NCSL. (2021, Sep 24).
    https://www.ncsl.org/research/transportation/state-ignition-interlock-laws.aspx